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View Full Version : Inmate Claims He's Too Fat to be Executed



Repeat
08-05-2008, 07:44 AM
I guess we'll just have to go back to firing squad, huh? I doubt he's too fat for that. This man was committed his crime 22 years ago. My tax dollars (I'm from Ohio) have been going to keep this mother fucker alive (and fat) for all that time. Bullshit. I have a 9-cent lead solution...


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,397082,00.html


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COLUMBUS, Ohio — A death row inmate scheduled for execution in October says he's so fat that Ohio executioners would have trouble finding his veins and that his weight could diminish the effectiveness of one of the lethal injection drugs.

Lawyers for Richard Cooey argue in a federal lawsuit that Cooey had poor veins when he faced execution five years ago and that the problem has been worsened by weight gain.

They cite a document filed by a prison nurse in 2003 that said Cooey had sparse veins and that executioners would need extra time.

"When you start the IV's come 15 minutes early," wrote the nurse who examined Cooey. "I don't have any veins."

The lawsuit, filed Friday in federal court in Columbus, also says prison officials have had difficulty drawing blood from Cooey for medical procedures. Cooey is 5 feet 7 inches tall and weighs 267 pounds, according to the lawsuit.

Cooey, 41, was sentenced to die for raping and murdering two female University of Akron students in 1986. After a federal judge granted Cooey a last-minute reprieve in 2003, Cooey was returned to death row. In April, he lost a challenge to Ohio's lethal injection process when the U.S. Supreme Court said he had missed a deadline to file a lawsuit.

Cooey's execution is scheduled for Oct. 14. He would be the first inmate put to death in Ohio since Christopher Newton was executed last year for killing a prison cellmate over their chess games.

It would also be the first execution in Ohio since the end of an unofficial national moratorium on executions that began l injection procedure.

Since the court upheld the procedure in April, 16 inmates have been executed around the country.

Attorneys for Cooey in his latest lawsuit say a drug he is taking for migraine headaches could diminish the effectiveness of the first of three drugs Ohio uses in its execution process.

Cooey's use of the drug Topamax, a type of seizure medication, may have created a resistance to thiopental, the drug used to put inmates to sleep before two other lethal drugs are administered, Dr. Mark Heath, a physician hired by the Ohio Public Defender's Office, said in documents filed with the court.

Heath also says Cooey's weight, combined with the potential drug resistance, increases the risk he would not be properly anesthetized.

That's a real concern for Cooey, his public defender, Kelly Culshaw Schneider, said Monday.

"All of the experts agree if the first drug doesn't work, the execution is going to be excruciating," she said.

She said the Department of Rehabilitation and Correction has not indicated how they would deal with Cooey's vein problems.

Prisons system spokeswoman Andrea Carson and Jim Gravelle, a spokesman for the Ohio Attorney General's Office, both said Monday they hadn't seen the lawsuit and couldn't comment.

Last year, Carson cited the obesity of Newton as one of the reasons prison officials had difficulty accessing his veins before his May 24 execution. Newton was 6 feet, 265 pounds.

Two years ago, convicted killer Jeffrey Lundgren argued unsuccessfully that he was at greater risk of experiencing pain and suffering because he was overweight and diabetic.

A federal appeals court rejected the claim by Lundgren, convicted of killing a family of five in an eastern Ohio cult killing. He was executed in October 2006.

In 1999, lawyers for Florida condemned killer Allen Davis, who weighed 350 pounds, argued the voltage in the electric chair fell short of the amount needed to kill painlessly, especially for a man the size of Allen.

During Allen's execution, blood poured from his face in what officials said was a nosebleed that happened after he died.

KingTim
08-05-2008, 07:52 AM
Damn thats crazy. I agree kill him some other way. For what he did he deserves to die.

SpikedRocker
08-05-2008, 08:05 AM
I read about this story this morning, only in Ohio eh Repeat? hehe

LegalSmash
08-05-2008, 08:21 AM
use a saw, or kill him with fire.

Red
08-05-2008, 10:07 AM
Would they have troubles feeding a bullet into his brain?

Dracula
08-05-2008, 10:11 AM
Would they have troubles feeding a bullet into his brain?

I was just about to type that +rep

Daze
08-05-2008, 10:16 AM
why should he been shown human decency?

why should he get a painless death?

did those 2 girls he raped and killed get a painless exit?

i doubt it.

Repeat
08-05-2008, 10:31 AM
Would they have troubles feeding a bullet into his brain?

Exactly! That's my 9-cent solution. Why do we keep these people alive?

Omar
08-05-2008, 10:50 AM
use a saw, or kill him with fire.

FIAR!! FIRE!!! FIRE! MUAHAAHHAHHHAHA! :)

Lux
08-05-2008, 11:28 AM
Why does it take over 20 years for someone to be killed?

He raped two students and then killed them, why does he deserve a painless death???

To be honest shooting him in the face is just going to kill him anyway......why didn't they do that 20 years ago instead of wasting tax payers money?

BOOWY
08-05-2008, 11:46 AM
I would imagine that they want to be absolutely sure that they have the right guy. If the criminal in question admitted to doing it and doesn't deny it, I don't see why it would take 20 years, but certainly if he denies that he did it then there is a slim possibility that he didn't do it. People have been released from prison years later for something they didn't do based on new evidence.

There would certainly be an uproar if they executed someone who turned out to be innocent.

EDIT: Also, I think killing a criminal too early would be doing him a favor to be honest. Who wouldn't want to be executed over living the rest of their life in prison?

Italian Jew
08-05-2008, 11:47 AM
I know he deserves execution, but executions cost more than imprisonment (I don't care about the cost in this case, but I'm not paying for it really).

Even though bullets are relatively cheap, the process involved can cost millions of dollars more than life in prison. I think it should be a lot cheaper so it would be more efficient than imprisonment, but what can you do?

Red
08-05-2008, 12:05 PM
I know he deserves execution, but executions cost more than imprisonment (I don't care about the cost in this case, but I'm not paying for it really).

Even though bullets are relatively cheap, the process involved can cost millions of dollars more than life in prison. I think it should be a lot cheaper so it would be more efficient than imprisonment, but what can you do?

You serious?

Can you please find me a source with figures? That's such bullshit if it's true.

Italian Jew
08-05-2008, 12:28 PM
Here is what I found:

http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/COcosttestimony.pdf

http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/article.php?did=108

The point made is that if one is sentenced to a death penalty, the costs of the case(including appeals), imprisonment, other legal matters, and the actual execution amount to more than just life imprisonment.

The problem is that if you are given the death penalty, you are not immediately killed. Most of the convicted wait many years before they are finally killed, but by that time all the bills pile up.

As I said before, I would want the death penalty to be more efficient so the convicted wouldn't have to wait (I know, they are so anxious) and the costs would be significantly lower. However, the problems remains that the person in question could be innocent even though he was given the death penalty. This just means the legal processes involved before the sentencing need to be more precise and leave little question or room for appeals.

Slavic
08-05-2008, 04:40 PM
Here is what I found:

http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/COcosttestimony.pdf

http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/article.php?did=108

The point made is that if one is sentenced to a death penalty, the costs of the case(including appeals), imprisonment, other legal matters, and the actual execution amount to more than just life imprisonment.

The problem is that if you are given the death penalty, you are not immediately killed. Most of the convicted wait many years before they are finally killed, but by that time all the bills pile up.

As I said before, I would want the death penalty to be more efficient so the convicted wouldn't have to wait (I know, they are so anxious) and the costs would be significantly lower. However, the problems remains that the person in question could be innocent even though he was given the death penalty. This just means the legal processes involved before the sentencing need to be more precise and leave little question or room for appeals.

I think they should bring back the process of working in prisons. Growing food, doing simple construction on site, manufacturing small goods. Get them to generate some money that can help offset the costs of feeding and housing all the inmates. We need to bring back ball and chain gangs. Some may argue that as a form of slavery. I see it as working for your keep. These prisoners are given a place of rest, food, and other form of activities. They should be made to generate some sort of revenue to compensate for the services they are receiving.

In regard to the man being to fat for lethal injection. I don't see how a firing squad would not be effective or a coup de grâce. There are still 2 states that use firing squads.

GrayFox
08-05-2008, 05:05 PM
His attorneys say a drug he is taking for migraine headaches could affect the execution process. The drug Topamax, a type of seizure medication, may have created a resistance to thiopental, the drug used to put inmates to sleep before two other lethal drugs are administered, Dr. Mark Heath, a physician hired by the Ohio Public Defender's Office, said in documents filed with the court.

I like this part. Its like, whats the worst that could happen if they go through with it anyways, that he dies?

barackobama
08-05-2008, 05:35 PM
Haha, good way to escape the death charge!

Lux
08-05-2008, 05:54 PM
Blindfold... $10
Cheap rifle... $200
Clip of bullets... $100

The satisfaction of killing someone... Priceless.

For everything else, there's BastardCard.

classic.

Repeat
08-06-2008, 07:37 AM
Or, why not just do what the Nazis did and have a compeltely self-sufficient labour camp? The mattresses are made of hair, gold teeth are melted down for nice chandeliers in the Officers Quarters, and possessions are sold to pay for more gas grenades.

Why, I love nice chandeliers. What a coincidence!


Indeed, old bean. Mm'yes indeed, indeed.

Red
08-06-2008, 10:21 AM
MMM a hair mattress, that sounds soft.

Slavic
08-06-2008, 05:16 PM
Or, why not just do what the Nazis did and have a compeltely self-sufficient labour camp? The mattresses are made of hair, gold teeth are melted down for nice chandeliers in the Officers Quarters, and possessions are sold to pay for more gas grenades.

People are in prisons because they can not live with the laws of their current society. In order to correct this their civil rights are restricted. Instead of letting them rot in a cell hoping that the guilt system will rehabilitate them; they should be put to work to build a stronger character.

Repeat
08-06-2008, 08:24 PM
People are in prisons because they can not live with the laws of their current society. In order to correct this their civil rights are restricted. Instead of letting them rot in a cell hoping that the guilt system will rehabilitate them; they should be put to work to build a stronger character.

Or as I prefer - put to death to get rid of the fuckers.
:001_rolleyes:

AppleShark
08-07-2008, 06:36 AM
Or as I prefer - put to death to get rid of the fuckers.
:001_rolleyes:

Make a note of this - Repeat is never allowed to watch V for Vendetta. EVER.

Repeat
10-14-2008, 11:38 AM
CINCINNATI — Ohio executed a 5-foot-7, 267-pound double murderer who argued he was too fat to die humanely by lethal injection on Tuesday, the state's first execution since the end of an unofficial national moratorium.

Richard Cooey, 41, died at 10:28 a.m. at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville.

There were no immediate reports of problems finding suitable veins to deliver the deadly chemicals, a problem that delayed previous executions in the state.

Cooey's attorneys had argued that his weight problem would make it difficult for prison staff to access a vein. A prisons spokeswoman said Cooey received a pre-execution exam early Tuesday and was cleared.

Cooey, who killed two University of Akron students in 1986, walked into the death chamber at 10:15 a.m. wearing gray pants and was strapped onto the gurney.

"You (expletive) haven't paid any attention to anything I've said in the last 22 1/2 years, why would anyone pay any attention to anything I've had to say now," Cooey said looking at the ceiling. He made no other comment.

Cooey tapped the fingers of his left hand several times before he died and his face took on a purple shade.

Six family members of one of his victims watched the execution. Summit County Prosecutor Sherri Bevan Walsh said the family was disappointed that Cooey was vulgar and hateful at the end.

Cooey was the first inmate executed in Ohio in more than a year, and the state's first since the end of the unofficial moratorium on executions that began last year while the U.S. Supreme Court reviewed Kentucky's lethal injection procedure.

Before the moratorium, Ohio had one of the nation's busiest death chambers.

Cooey lost a final appeal earlier Tuesday when the U.S. Supreme Court turned down without comment his complaint that the state's protocol for lethal injection could cause an agonizing and painful death. Cooey wanted the state to use a single drug rather than a three-drug combination, and asked for a stay of execution pending a hearing on that motion.

The court on Monday denied a separate appeal based on Cooey's claim that his obesity was a bar to humane lethal injection. The argument also had been rejected by a federal appeals court in Cincinnati and the Ohio Supreme Court, with both courts ruling that he missed a deadline for filing appeals.

Cooey is 75 pounds heavier than when he went to death row — the result of prison food and 23-hour-a-day confinement, his lawyers said.

They also argued that a migraine medicine prescribed by a prison physician could reduce the effect of the anesthetic used as part of the three-drug lethal injection.

They claimed that Ohio has a history of botched executions.

The last Ohio inmate to be executed was Christopher Newton — who was similar in size to Cooey — in May 2007. The execution team had trouble putting IVs in his arm, delaying his execution nearly two hours. There were similar problems in the execution of another inmate in 2006.

Cooey made an earlier trip to the death house. But a U.S. District Court judge intervened hours before his scheduled execution in July 2003 when the Ohio Public Defender's office said it needed more time to assess the case after an appeals court dismissed his previous attorneys for inadequate representation.

Cooey and a co-defendant were convicted in the sexual assaults and slayings of University of Akron students Dawn McCreery, 20, and Wendy Offredo, 21, in September 1986. His co-defendant was 17 and was sentenced to life in prison because of his age.

The state has now executed 27 inmates since 1999, when Ohio renewed executions after more than three decades.


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,437445,00.html

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*Peter Griffin Laugh*

Mammal
10-14-2008, 11:58 AM
FIAR!! FIRE!!! FIRE! MUAHAAHHAHHHAHA! :)

Your a fire starter,
Twisted fire started ...

Mammal
10-14-2008, 12:31 PM
That works too ;)

Zero001
10-14-2008, 01:52 PM
MMM a hair mattress, that sounds soft.

and itchy :sad:

Toxin
10-14-2008, 03:52 PM
I think it's just sad that the United States is executing it's citizens...

Italian Jew
10-14-2008, 03:58 PM
Um, why? He sexually assaulted and killed two people.

LegalSmash
10-14-2008, 05:06 PM
I think it's just sad that the United States is executing it's citizens...

I think its sad that Europe lost its collective balls and WONT execute those that NEED to die to protect the greater community.

He deserved to die, now he has. He costs society less this way.

Repeat
10-15-2008, 01:07 PM
We don't think of ourselves as more important than we are. Euthanasia is illegal, so why can people judge that people should be killed for a "greater good"? Using those words sounds odd, if you ask me, when you describe a country that is supposed to be the epitome of the free world.

Nah you guys just don't have enough balls.

AMERICA: WE'VE GOT HUGE BALLS!!!



:-P Before you freak out Havok, I'm kidding.

LegalSmash
10-15-2008, 01:20 PM
We don't think of ourselves as more important than we are. Euthanasia is illegal, so why can people judge that people should be killed for a "greater good"? Using those words sounds odd, if you ask me, when you describe a country that is supposed to be the epitome of the free world.


He committed a crime against the state, against the nation, and most importantly against the people thereof.

England has lost its true self, which is why London is Londonistan, you over pay taxes to support immigrants, chavs, and other undesirables, and you are excessively politically correct.

Draw and Quarter a few people, and watch how fast the rude boys start to behave.

Executions work, believe it.

Supporting inmates in US Penal System:

37,000 a year till 50
60-75K year to support over 50
80+ years old 100K a year +

Killing them: less than 100,000, whereas supporting them for 3 years costs you more than the execution.

We need to expand executions for lesser crimes.

Repeat
10-15-2008, 01:54 PM
A single bullet isn't very expensive at all!

Italian Jew
10-15-2008, 04:01 PM
But the process to use that bullet it is expensive (if not bullets, then electricity, lethal injection, etc.). They are not more cost effective, but they can be if you remove much of the bureaucracy and nonsense out of the way. Even though they are more expensive, executions are an effective way to prevent somebody from doing anymore harm to society without letting them live. If you kill someone unlawfully, I'd say you lost your privilege to live.

LegalSmash
10-15-2008, 05:00 PM
Sorry, but no matter what you offer up as facts, mostly entirely opinion, neither of us will ever be correct about the subject. Your legal system kills people, ours doesn't, let's leave it at that.

With all due respect, and I'm sure you'll still get riled up about it but:

Lets leave it at Britain is weak willed and has been since the 1960s, which is fact, not opinion.

I've seen you come here and whine about how the chavs mimic "american culture" (Which, BTW, is not "american culture" but "black urban culture"), its not that this "new" culture is uprooting "good british ideas and customs" its your own people have let your culture fall into the shitter. Your national dish is Curry or Chicken Tikka Masala for fucks sake. The US may have the largest hodgepodge of immigrants standing as citizens, residents, and illegals combined, but our national dish is not fucking tacos. You've simply let yourselves go apeshit on "inclusiveness" and political correctness.


Left wing ideology has essentially turned Britain into 1984esque nightmare for whomever is not Pakistani, Indian, impoverished anglo, or some other garden variety European. You all punished a MP for saying "nitty gritty" in 2002 because the term had some colloquial meaning in the slavery days of yore.

I really hoped when Thatcher and Blair served that things would improve for the nation that gave my nation its founding principles, but it has not. Honestly, I pray for your country, because its not a Britain that most British people who I've met in DC, at school, in the law, and through various other occasions are particularly proud of.

I'm not saying it to be a dick, but you are ignoring the real problem if you just want to say "Tally Ho, Its the bloody Yanks' fault" when your kids are walking around with their pants at their knees and living off the dole like its nothing to be ashamed of. You need to instill pride and work ethic into people, and a feeling that "I need to do this to succeed" and not just allow them to suckle at the Government/Parliment/Queen (God Save Her)'s Financial Teet.

As tot he actual crux of the matter of the thread:
Killing assholes that would otherwise tear asunder society and the safety the rules by which we live provide is not "wrong", its necessary.

Repeat
10-15-2008, 07:57 PM
But the process to use that bullet it is expensive (if not bullets, then electricity, lethal injection, etc.). They are not more cost effective, but they can be if you remove much of the bureaucracy and nonsense out of the way. Even though they are more expensive, executions are an effective way to prevent somebody from doing anymore harm to society without letting them live. If you kill someone unlawfully, I'd say you lost your privilege to live.

First of all -- agreed on the last sentence. Baddies need to bite the dust sometimes.


Secondly, if states were to invest in a one time cost, we could solve this matter. What would this one time cost be, you ask? I'll tell you.

An executioner robot. Yeah! How awesome would this be?! Really great. It would have a big gun on it to kill the bad guys with. It's wired (and encrypted) so that it knows who to kill when the time arises. That way, you can't say that someone is still killing the person, just through the robot. The robot is doing that shit. Moral dilemas? Absolved. Awesome.

Oh and the robot's name is Giggles. Or something like that.




Also it's programmed to say witty Ahh'nold Schwarz'neger lines right before it blows the bad guys brains out.


And then smaller robots come out of its feet and clean the mess up and carry the body to where ever it needs to go.